Enduro

In a traditional time-keeping enduro, riders leave together in groups or rows, and each row starts at a certain minute.  The object of the event is to arrive at pre-defined locations according to a strict schedule.  Early or late arrivals result in the riders’ scores being penalized. Riders frequently use “roll charts” (printed rolls of paper with course directions on them) and/or GPS devices to ensure they stick to the course and are on-schedule.

Throughout an event there are designated time periods for refueling and servicing the machines.  Penalties apply for not meeting defined times, not following the specified course, or for receiving outside assistance when not permitted – generally, each rider is on his own and cannot accept assistance from anyone else, although particularly difficult sections of a course may be designated as areas where outside assistance is allowed.  Enduro riders will frequently carry small tool kits and some spare parts, like inner tubes and spark plugs, with them so that they can perform basic repairs in the field.

An enduro can be a grueling event, and demands that riders be in peak physical condition to compete at the highest levels, while at the same time there are classes suitable for casual riders and youth competitors that frequently utilize less challenging trails and have shorter durations.

Read more about the sport of enduro and it’s history at Wikipedia

Enduro

Enduro

There are youth classes in enduro events as well!

Youth Enduro

Youth Enduro

sched points

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